Workforce

FBI seeks CIO

Wikimedia image: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) logo.

The FBI needs a new CIO to manage the Bureau's growing IT portfolio. A job posting on the FBI website calls for a seasoned executive with "thorough experience developing enterprise IT strategies and roadmap."

Jerome Pender stepped down as CIO in August. Since then, Brian Truchon, a 30-year veteran of the Bureau who has served as assistant director of its IT Services Division, has been acting CIO, according to an FBI spokesperson.

Whoever takes the gig, will lead the FBI's $1 billion IT operation forward in an era of cloud computing and data center consolidation.

The FBI prefers someone with both public- and private-sector IT experience. The new hire will not only play the traditional managerial role of the CIO but also put in legwork in the field to understand the FBI's operational and tech needs, according to the job notice. The FBI CIO also serves as something of a conduit between law enforcement and intelligence IT officials via the Intelligence Community CIO Council.

According to the IT Dashboard, some of the FBI's big-money IT projects in fiscal 2015 included $120.5 million for the Next Generation Identification biometric system, $57.3 million on data centers, and $37.1 million for the Sentinel case management system.

Applications for the CIO position are due Jan. 22.

About the Author

Sean Lyngaas is an FCW staff writer covering defense, cybersecurity and intelligence issues. Prior to joining FCW, he was a reporter and editor at Smart Grid Today, where he covered everything from cyber vulnerabilities in the U.S. electric grid to the national energy policies of Britain and Mexico. His reporting on a range of global issues has appeared in publications such as The Atlantic, The Economist, The Washington Diplomat and The Washington Post.

Lyngaas is an active member of the National Press Club, where he served as chairman of the Young Members Committee. He earned his M.A. in international affairs from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and his B.A. in public policy from Duke University.

Click here for previous articles by Lyngaas, or connect with him on Twitter: @snlyngaas.


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