Congress

House panel advances Email Privacy Act

Shutterstock image (by Bruce Rolff): eyes in a binary tunnel.

The House Judiciary Committee unanimously advanced long-stalled email privacy legislation that would require a government warrant for technology companies to hand over their customers' electronic communications.

The bill would update a 30-year-old law that has allowed the government to subpoena electronic information older than 180 days. Backers of the new legislation say it would provide a standard for obtaining a warrant regardless of how old an email message is or whether it has been opened.

On April 13, the committee moved the Email Privacy Act in the form of a substitute amendment offered by Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) that is designed to address concerns that the bill would hinder law enforcement investigations.

The bill as amended would do away with a provision requiring law enforcement agencies to notify people whose communications have been targeted by a warrant.

The revisions have generated mixed reactions from privacy groups. The Electronic Frontier Foundation grudgingly supported the changes, while the American Civil Liberties Union said it hoped to reverse some of the new provisions as the bill progresses in Congress.

The original bill "dramatically expands the reach of the warrant requirement and imposes new requirements on law enforcement that could impede criminal investigations and threaten public safety," Goodlatte said in his opening statement, justifying his substitute amendment.

"And despite the number of House co-sponsors, the bill as introduced is opposed by virtually every law enforcement and prosecutorial association in the country," he added. The bill has attracted at least 314 co-sponsors -- the most, supporters say, for any bill that hasn't received a vote on the House floor.

Judiciary Committee members said they had more work to do on electronic privacy, namely through a bill put forth by Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) that seeks protection for users' geolocation data.

The Center for Democracy and Technology, another digital privacy group, lauded the Email Privacy Act's advancement out of committee. "It's a huge step forward to bring the same protections we enjoy in our homes to our digital lives," said Chris Calabrese, the organization's vice president of policy, in a statement.

About the Author

Sean Lyngaas is an FCW staff writer covering defense, cybersecurity and intelligence issues. Prior to joining FCW, he was a reporter and editor at Smart Grid Today, where he covered everything from cyber vulnerabilities in the U.S. electric grid to the national energy policies of Britain and Mexico. His reporting on a range of global issues has appeared in publications such as The Atlantic, The Economist, The Washington Diplomat and The Washington Post.

Lyngaas is an active member of the National Press Club, where he served as chairman of the Young Members Committee. He earned his M.A. in international affairs from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and his B.A. in public policy from Duke University.

Click here for previous articles by Lyngaas, or connect with him on Twitter: @snlyngaas.


Featured

  • Telecommunications
    Stock photo ID: 658810513 By asharkyu

    GSA extends EIS deadline to 2023

    Agencies are getting up to three more years on existing telecom contracts before having to shift to the $50 billion Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions vehicle.

  • Workforce
    Shutterstock image ID: 569172169 By Zenzen

    OMB looks to retrain feds to fill cyber needs

    The federal government is taking steps to fill high-demand, skills-gap positions in tech by retraining employees already working within agencies without a cyber or IT background.

  • Acquisition
    GSA Headquarters (Photo by Rena Schild/Shutterstock)

    GSA to consolidate multiple award schedules

    The General Services Administration plans to consolidate dozens of its buying schedules across product areas including IT and services to reduce duplication.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.