Cybersecurity

Watchdog: Treasury hitting the mark as cyber steward

Shutterstock image (by deepadesigns): protection concept, shield icon.

The Treasury Department is right in line with presidential directives to enhance critical infrastructure security through better national coordination and public/private partnerships, according to a report by the agency's inspector general.

The April 28 report, which comes as critical infrastructure sectors face an onslaught of breach attempts, contains no recommendations for different or additional actions.

The IG found that Treasury was meeting all its obligations as the agency for the financial services sector. Those obligations include preparing for cyber and physical attacks aimed at the U.S. financial system.

Treasury has been meeting a range of reporting requirements and engaging in close consultation with the Department of Homeland Security, regulatory agencies and the financial industry, the report states.

For example, during the Heartbleed vulnerability, Treasury worked with DHS to stay abreast of developments and threats to secure transactions and shared that information with financial industry leaders.

The report praised the work Treasury has done with the Financial Services Sector Coordinating Council for Critical Infrastructure Protection and Homeland Security and with the Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center.

About the Author

Zach Noble is a staff writer covering digital citizen services, workforce issues and a range of civilian federal agencies.

Before joining FCW in 2015, Noble served as assistant editor at the viral news site TheBlaze, where he wrote a mix of business, political and breaking news stories and managed weekend news coverage. He has also written for online and print publications including The Washington Free Beacon, The Santa Barbara News-Press, The Federalist and Washington Technology.

Noble is a graduate of Saint Vincent College, where he studied English, economics and mathematics.

Click here for previous articles by Noble, or connect with him on Twitter: @thezachnoble.


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