Budget

White House, Senate at odds over Census funding

Shutterstock image. Copyright: Michele Paccione. 

The White House hit back against Senate appropriators in a June 14 statement, arguing that Senate-proposed funding levels would "undermine" the Census Bureau's work toward a tech-powered, cheaper 2020 Census.

The Senate's Commerce Department funding bill would earmark almost $1.25 billion for Census' periodic programs, which include the 2020 enumeration, in fiscal year 2017.

That's $100 million less than the Obama administration's funding request.

Census has been planning to use mobile devices, internet response options and outside data sources to cut the decennial census cost by $5 billion.

"The bill's funding level puts these design changes at risk, potentially increasing the cost to the taxpayer for administering the 2020 Decennial Census or requiring unsustainable reductions in other critical surveys," the White House warned in the message, which threatened a veto of the bill if passed in its present form

Senate appropriators are concerned about controlling ballooning budgets.

Senate Appropriations Committee report on the funding bill noted that the $1.25 billion in periodic survey funding, while less than the presidential request, is a $150 million bump over fiscal year 2016. The report characterized the decennial census as an "expensive, high-risk" program with "persistent accountability issues."

The funding bill, accordingly, would dedicate almost $2.6 million to the Census Bureau's Office of the Inspector General.

Despite keeping the purse strings tights, appropriators have high expectations of the Census Bureau.

"The Bureau shall continue to work to bring down the cost of the 2020 Decennial Census to a level less than the 2010 Census, not adjusting for inflation," the report commands. "The Committee is mindful of the Bureau's efforts and expects that the increased testing early in this decennial cycle will result in significant cost savings over the course of the entire 2020 Census."

A Census Bureau spokesperson did not return a request for comment.

Under regular congressional scrutiny, Census officials have testified that their plans for 2020 are, so far, on schedule.

About the Author

Zach Noble is a staff writer covering digital citizen services, workforce issues and a range of civilian federal agencies.

Before joining FCW in 2015, Noble served as assistant editor at the viral news site TheBlaze, where he wrote a mix of business, political and breaking news stories and managed weekend news coverage. He has also written for online and print publications including The Washington Free Beacon, The Santa Barbara News-Press, The Federalist and Washington Technology.

Noble is a graduate of Saint Vincent College, where he studied English, economics and mathematics.

Click here for previous articles by Noble, or connect with him on Twitter: @thezachnoble.


Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.