Critical Read

Cybersecurity spending not at risk in election

Cyberattack, financial services 

WHAT: Govini's outlook for 2017 DHS spending

WHY: The priorities of a new administration will have an impact on the direction of federal spending, but cybersecurity is likely to keep seeing funding increases, no matter who wins the election, according to an analysis by Govini.

"The flood of cybersecurity spending will continue under either a Trump or Clinton presidency," said a new Govini study on DHS' fiscal 2017 outlook.

The agency's National Protection & Programs Directorate, Govini said, is set to sharpen it cybersecurity focus in the coming fiscal year. It has budgeted $471 million for the National Cybersecurity Protection System, its intrusion detection system that shares information across civilian agencies.

DHS also budgeted almost $274 million to speed up all three phases of its Continuous Diagnostics and Monitoring program during the period, as well as $283 million to develop analysis for critical infrastructure threat situational awareness and $211 million to support the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center.

That kind of spending, said the study, will likely continue under either administration because the stakes are too high not to. The rise of state-backed actors intent on breaking into government and private networks is "simply far too large to ignore," Govini said.

Overall, DHS is leveraging many technologies to modernize, increase mission relevancy and squeeze out cost-efficiencies across its components. Although each of the agency's 22 components has its own interpretation of those objectives, the report noted, each wants to leverage technologies like mobile, the Internet of Things, data analytics, and cybersecurity to address them.

Click here to download the study.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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