Emerging Technology

Scouting new vistas in mind-machine connections

abstract head representing big data

Sandia National Laboratories and the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity are working together to find ways to equip computers with algorithms that can recognize visual subtleties the human brain can divine in an instant.

They are overseeing a program called Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks, which seeks to supercharge machine learning by combining neuroscience and data science to reverse-engineer the human brain's processes, according to IARPA, which launched the effort in 2014.

Sandia officials recently announced plans to referee the brain algorithm replication work of three university-led teams. The teams will map the complex wiring of the brain's visual cortex, which makes sense of input from the eyes, and produce algorithms that will be tested over the next five years.

Other research teams will use different techniques to map the visual cortex, with the goal of generating new models of brain function. The five-year objective is to create an artificial intelligence capability that can recognize and classify unknown objects.

The MICrONS program is just a piece of the Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies "grand challenge" that the White House announced in 2013 "to revolutionize our understanding of the human mind and uncover new ways to treat, prevent, and cure brain disorders like Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, autism, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury."

The Sandia/IARPA research is designed to pave the way for a deeper understanding of how the brain identifies patterns and classifies objects, such as understanding that a green apple is still an apple even though it's not red.

Replicating those kinds of nuances can improve how computer algorithms perform, according to researchers. Practical applications of that capability could, for example, improve how national security and intelligence analysts find patterns in huge datasets.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.