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IT, management advice for the new administration

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The clock is ticking on the transition, and President-elect Donald Trump's team is moving fast to fill positions across government, from high-visibility Cabinet posts to backroom policy jobs deep in agencies and components.

Over the course of the election season, FCW's resident blogger Steve Kelman and a roster of contributors have offered advice on how the next president should handle issues ranging from management to cybersecurity to IT governance. And FCW's reporting team has gathered advice from thought leaders in and out of government. Here's what people are saying.

Priming the pump for innovation in the next administration

Incorporating technology and innovation early in transition planning will position the next administration to define meaningful, achievable and scalable policy priorities and prepare for an effective first 100 days and beyond.

A bipartisan proposal for performance management in the next administration

Continuity is particularly important for implementing systemic management reforms, such as making performance measurement an accepted part of how the government does business, because those reforms are typically low visibility and can easily be put off track by starts and stops with every new administration.

What the next administration needs to do about the workforce

No matter how much technology the government wants to deploy, it needs talented people to accomplish its many missions.

What the next president needs to do on cyber

To continue to lead the world in cyber innovation and capabilities, it's imperative that the U.S. make cyber education a priority and view it as every bit as necessary as teaching chemistry or algebra.

Will the next president keep IT modernization going?

Some IT leaders have expressed concern that a new administration might not feel the same urgency to maintain the pace of reform.

Data policy for a new administration

The government needs to institutionalize the gains that have been made in data policy to effectively build on any progress.

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