Congress

House cyber leaders push CDM funding

 

Three lawmakers with cyber policy expertise are pushing appropriators to fully fund the administration’s request for continuous diagnostics funding in the Department of Homeland Security’s budget.

The White House’s fiscal year 2019 budget request proposes $237 million in funding for the Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation program to provide civilian agencies access to tools and personnel to secure networks, identify trusted users and monitor network traffic on their websites.

The lawmakers -- Reps. John Ratcliffe (R-Texas), Jim Langevin (D-R.I.) and Will Hurd (R-Texas) --want to make sure appropriators fully fund the program.

"The CDM program is of paramount importance because of its ability to provide the federal enterprise with the ability to monitor and assess the vulnerabilities and threats to its networks and systems in an ever-changing cyber threat landscape," they wrote in a letter to Reps. John Carter (R-Texas) and Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.), the chair and ranking member of the House Appropriations Committee's panel on Homeland Security.

The House Homeland Security Committee's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection Subcommittee and the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee's Information Technology Subcommittee -- which Ratcliffe and Hurd respectively chair -- are scheduled to hold a joint hearing on the CDM program March 20.

About the Author

Chase Gunter is a staff writer covering civilian agencies, workforce issues, health IT, open data and innovation.

Prior to joining FCW, Gunter reported for the C-Ville Weekly in Charlottesville, Va., and served as a college sports beat writer for the South Boston (Va.) News and Record. He started at FCW as an editorial fellow before joining the team full-time as a reporter.

Gunter is a graduate of the University of Virginia, where his emphases were English, history and media studies.

Click here for previous articles by Gunter, or connect with him on Twitter: @WChaseGunter

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