Congress

Senate passes 2-year budget deal

By Orhan Cam Royalty-free stock photo ID: 546416560 United States Capitol Building in Washington DC USA 

The Senate passed a two-year budget resolution on Aug. 1 that sets caps for military and domestic spending through fiscal year 2021 and extends the debt ceiling through July 31, 2021, punting several sensitive spending issues until after the 2020 election.

The measure, which passed the House of Representatives last week, increases discretionary spending to $1.37 trillion in 2020 and $1.375 trillion in 2021. Spending for the current year is $1.32 trillion. Spending rises on both the defense and civilian side.

The Senate passed the bill on a 67-28 vote. President Donald Trump tweeted in support of the bill ahead of the vote and is expected to sign it.

The budget agreement doesn't eliminate the possibility of a government shutdown at the start of fiscal year 2020 on Oct. 1. Lawmakers still have to pass individual spending bills, an omnibus appropriations package or a continuing resolution to keep the government open.

"This agreement will help prevent another disastrous government shutdown," Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), the minority whip, said in a statement. "While not perfect, this budget agreement will finally allow Congress to work on this year’s appropriations bills and invest in the programs that the American people rely on."

About the Author

Adam Mazmanian is executive editor of FCW.

Before joining the editing team, Mazmanian was an FCW staff writer covering Congress, government-wide technology policy and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Prior to joining FCW, Mazmanian was technology correspondent for National Journal and served in a variety of editorial roles at B2B news service SmartBrief. Mazmanian has contributed reviews and articles to the Washington Post, the Washington City Paper, Newsday, New York Press, Architect Magazine and other publications.

Click here for previous articles by Mazmanian. Connect with him on Twitter at @thisismaz.


Featured

  • Workforce
    Former vice-president Joe Biden formally launches his 2020 presidential campaign during a rally May 18, 2019, at Eakins Oval in Philadelphia. (Matt Smith Photographer/Shutterstock.com)

    Biden promises to undo Trump’s workforce policies

    Democratic candidate pledges to appropriate permanent funding to feds in case of another shutdown.

  • People
    Federal CIO Suzette Kent

    Federal CIO Kent to exit in July

    During her tenure, Suzette Kent pushed on policies including Trusted Internet Connection, identity management and the creation of the Chief Data Officers Council

Stay Connected

FCW INSIDER

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.