Acquisition

More telecom vendors tipped for EIS authority

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BT Federal, Core Technologies, and Harris Corp. will probably get accreditation by the end of September to provide service under the General Services Administration's next generation telecommunications contract.

All three companies have all topped 90 percent completion of GSA's testing of their back office support systems for the $50 billion, 15-year Enterprise Infrastructure Solutions contract. Completing the test leads to an Authority to Operate (ATO) and the ability to cut service contracts with federal agencies.

Currently, only the three largest of the nine EIS vendors, AT&T, CenturyLink and Verizon, have ATOs and have been fulfilling agency solicitations. NASA awarded CenturyLink the first EIS contract in April, while AT&T recently announced a $1 billion contract with the Justice Department.

At an ACT IAC event in late July, Alan Thomas, commissioner of the agency's Federal Acquisition Service, said he expected the remaining six vendors to receive ATOs by the end of the year , with three likely awarded by the end of the fiscal year in October. The remaining three would come by the end of the calendar year, he said. He didn't put any names to the order however.

GSA's latest EIS Business Support System report released on Aug. 8 lays out that order in completion numbers.

The report shows BT Federal, Core Technologies and Harris Corp. all at 91.3 percent complete.

Microtech is at 88.4 percent; Granite Telecommunications has completed 83.5 percent of the testing, while MetTel has completed 78.7 percent, according to the report.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at mrockwell@fcw.com or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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