Acquisition

OFPP wants to define procurement 'lead time'

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The Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) wants to nail down language on exactly when federal procurements begin and end to help eliminate delays.

OFPP proposed a rule change and is seeking comments on redefining the term "Procurement Administrative Lead Time" (PALT) and on a plan for measuring and publicly reporting governmentwide data on PALT for contracts and orders above the simplified acquisition threshold.

The agency wants to adopt the definition from section 878 of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act. That language defines PALT as "the time between the date on which an initial solicitation for a contract or order is issued by a federal department or agency and the date of the award of the contract or order."

Establishing a common PALT definition, said OFPP, as well as a plan to measure and report it can help the government pin down delays in the procurement process. Equipped with a common definition, it said, agencies can then use common data to make improvements.

Alan Chvotkin, executive vice president and counsel of the Professional Services Council, said he was "pleased" with OFPP's proposed use of the NDAA definition.

"Time is money" for both federal agencies and contractors involved in an acquisition, he told FCW, adding that a revised PALT definition would help measure both.

Others want to tweak it a bit.

"I propose that PALT be defined as the cycle time between the solicitation response and the date award," said Dave Zvenyach, former executive director of GSA's 18F and former deputy commissioner for the agency’s Technology Transformation Service.

"PALT is the sort of topic that drives procurement nerds to drink," said Zvenyach in a blog post on the issue. Defining it has been traditionally hard to do, since pinning down the "initial moment of requirement identification is notoriously difficult."

Comments on the PALT language are due in 30 days.

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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