Cloud

GDIT hangs on to DEOS cloud contract

cloud applications (chanpipat/Shutterstock.com) 

The General Services Administration and U.S. Department of Defense re-awarded a contested cloud email and business software contract to the original winners, but with a lower value ceiling.

In an Oct. 30 statement, GSA and DOD said they had awarded the 10-year, $4.4 billion Defense Enterprise Office Solutions (DEOS) Blanket Purchase Agreement to General Dynamics IT and teaming partners Dell Marketing and Minburn Technology Group.

The contract covers the delivery, integration and support of Microsoft's cloud-based productivity suite Microsoft Office 365.

GSA and DOD had originally awarded DEOS to GDIT and teammates in August, 2019. That award was for a contract that had a $7.6 billion ceiling over 10 years.

That award was protested by Perspecta, the lead vendor on the team that missed out on DEOS. Ultimately, GSA and DOD reworked and re-competed the contracts.

It's not clear why the new award comes with a lower ceiling value. A GSA spokesperson declined to comment, citing the 10-day window for filing protests.

DEOS is a seminal cloud contract for the DOD. It sets enterprise-level, cloud-based productivity tools, such as word processing and spreadsheets, email, collaboration, file sharing and storage.

Under DEOS, Microsoft 365 will be deployed in unclassified and classified environments.

The contract is a key to the DOD's digital modernization efforts, said Dana Deasy, DOD CIO in an Oct. 30 statement.

The contract's "fit-for-purpose cloud offering will streamline our use of cloud email and collaborative tools while enhancing cybersecurity and information sharing based on standardized needs and market offerings," he said.

In the Oct. 30 statement, GSA and DOD noted the protest and said that the contracting team has "made every effort to ensure this process is fair, transparent, and equitable."

About the Author

Mark Rockwell is a senior staff writer at FCW, whose beat focuses on acquisition, the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Energy.

Before joining FCW, Rockwell was Washington correspondent for Government Security News, where he covered all aspects of homeland security from IT to detection dogs and border security. Over the last 25 years in Washington as a reporter, editor and correspondent, he has covered an increasingly wide array of high-tech issues for publications like Communications Week, Internet Week, Fiber Optics News, tele.com magazine and Wireless Week.

Rockwell received a Jesse H. Neal Award for his work covering telecommunications issues, and is a graduate of James Madison University.

Click here for previous articles by Rockwell. Contact him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter at @MRockwell4.


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