Circuit

Blog archive

NARA names 3 to new leadership positions

The National Archives and Records Administration created and filled three new positions in its recent restructuring — Tom Mills as chief operating officer; Analisa Archer as chief human capital officer; and Paul Wester as chief records officer — the agency has announced.

Archivist of the United States David Ferriero also announced formation of a new open government unit to use Web 2.0 and digital media and a new performance and accountability unit.

“I expect the National Archives to be a leader in open government, electronic records management and organizational effectiveness,” Ferriero said. “Putting the customer at the center of all we do, this new structure will enable us to build an open, inclusive work environment that encourages staff learning and creativity, invests in innovation, and engages all staff in continuously improving services.”

Mills previously was assistant archivist for regional records services, while Archer was formerly director of human resources services and Wester was director of the modern records program.

Four additional positions on the leadership team will be filled in the near future, Ferriero said.

Follow Alice Lipowicz on Twitter at @AliceLipowicz.

Posted by Alice Lipowicz on Mar 02, 2011 at 12:11 PM


Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.