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GPO gets a new inspector general

Michael Raponi is the new inspector general for the U.S. Government Printing Office, where he will be in charge of auditing GPO’s production and distribution of information products and services.

Raponi previously was the deputy assistant inspector general for audits at the Labor Department. He also has held various posts at inspectors general offices at the Agriculture, Housing and Urban Development and Veterans Affairs departments.

He takes charge of the GPO office from Interim Inspector General Rodolfo “Rudy” Ramirez, Jr., who served in that capacity since May. Previously, Tony Ogden had been the GPO's inspector general since 2007. Ogden currently is general counsel to the inspector general at the Environmental Protection Agency, according to his LInkedIn profile.

Raponi was appointed to the position by Public Printer Bill Boarman.

Raponi served in the U.S. Army as a Patriot Missile mechanic. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Northern Colorado and a master’s in business administration from Webster University in St. Louis, MO.

At the GPO, Raponi will investigate and audit programs including the Federal Digital System and the Federal Depository Library Program.

Posted by Alice Lipowicz on Nov 07, 2011 at 12:11 PM


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