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NASA picks a new technologist

Cornell University Professor Mason Peck is the new NASA chief technologist, NASA announced in a Nov. 8 news release.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden picked Peck to be the agency’s principal adviser and advocate on technology policy and programs. Peck, who starts in January, is charged with coordinating, tracking and integrating technology investments across the agency

"Mason's lifelong commitment to learning and expertise in aerospace engineering makes him ideally suited to advise and help guide the agency toward the technologies and innovations that will enable our future missions," Bolden said.

Peck will serve at NASA under an intergovernmental personnel agreement with Cornell, where he is an associate professor in the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

He succeeds Robert Braun, who returned to Georgia Institute of Technology.

Peck has worked at NASA before, as an engineer on the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites. His academic research has been supported by the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts and the International Space Station.

He also has worked for Boeing, Honeywell, Northrop Grumman, Goodrich, Lockheed Martin and Bell Helicopter. He has authored 82 academic articles and holds 17 patents in the U.S. and European Union.

Peck earned a doctorate in aerospace engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles and a master's degree in English literature from the University of Chicago.





Posted by Alice Lipowicz on Nov 09, 2011 at 12:11 PM


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