Blog archive

Feds: Keep your computers longer, Rep says

Rep. John Duncan, (R-Tenn.), has three cars. Two have well over 100,000 miles and one has about 98,000 miles, and he said "they're still doing real well."

He's not one to get the hottest and newest car on the market, and he thinks the government may not need the latest IT on the market either.

As he sees it though, agency officials want the hottest technology, and since it's on the government's tab, they get the most advanced IT with all "the latest bells and whistles."

At an Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on buying IT Feb. 27, he asked:

"How can we incentivize people to get more use out of the technology they have and hold onto it and use it one year longer or two years longer?"

Posted by Matthew Weigelt on Feb 28, 2013 at 12:10 PM

FCW in Print

In the latest issue: Looking back on three decades of big stories in federal IT.


  • Shutterstock image: looking for code.

    How DOD embraced bug bounties -- and how your agency can, too

    Hack the Pentagon proved to Defense Department officials that outside hackers can be assets, not adversaries.

  • Shutterstock image: cyber defense.

    Why PPD-41 is evolutionary, not revolutionary

    Government cybersecurity officials say the presidential policy directive codifies cyber incident response protocols but doesn't radically change what's been in practice in recent years.

  • Anne Rung -- Commerce Department Photo

    Exit interview with Anne Rung

    The government's departing top acquisition official said she leaves behind a solid foundation on which to build more effective and efficient federal IT.

  • Charles Phalen

    Administration appoints first head of NBIB

    The National Background Investigations Bureau announced the appointment of its first director as the agency prepares to take over processing government background checks.

  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.)

    Senator: Rigid hiring process pushes millennials from federal work

    Sen. James Lankford (R-Okla.) said agencies are missing out on younger workers because of the government's rigidity, particularly its protracted hiring process.

  • FCW @ 30 GPS

    FCW @ 30

    Since 1987, FCW has covered it all -- the major contracts, the disruptive technologies, the picayune scandals and the many, many people who make federal IT function. Here's a look back at six of the most significant stories.

Reader comments

Wed, Mar 6, 2013

Not to mention the cost savings that can be had simply from an energy perspective. Newer tech uses less energy, pure and simple. So, in this sense, I suppose that the IT/car comparison would be valid - newer cars offer higher mpg, so the Feds should approach it in the same analytical manner as far as TCO.

Fri, Mar 1, 2013

Too bad Rep. Duncan doesn't understand the concept of Total Cost of Ownership for IT works a little differently than car ownership. At EPA, our 2008 Dell laptops running XP are out of warranty and starting to fail in larger numbers every day. Given the MS drop-dead date for XP SP3 support, keeping this stuff going and secure is an expensive and risky proposition, no matter what Rep. Duncan says.

Fri, Mar 1, 2013

1. The computer/car comparison is not valid. 2. Government critics ask why feds are not using up to date technology so that we can be more efficient and pass the savings on to the taxpayer.

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group