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Feds: Keep your computers longer, Rep says

Rep. John Duncan, (R-Tenn.), has three cars. Two have well over 100,000 miles and one has about 98,000 miles, and he said "they're still doing real well."

He's not one to get the hottest and newest car on the market, and he thinks the government may not need the latest IT on the market either.

As he sees it though, agency officials want the hottest technology, and since it's on the government's tab, they get the most advanced IT with all "the latest bells and whistles."

At an Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on buying IT Feb. 27, he asked:

"How can we incentivize people to get more use out of the technology they have and hold onto it and use it one year longer or two years longer?"

Posted by Matthew Weigelt on Feb 28, 2013 at 12:10 PM


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Reader comments

Wed, Mar 6, 2013

Not to mention the cost savings that can be had simply from an energy perspective. Newer tech uses less energy, pure and simple. So, in this sense, I suppose that the IT/car comparison would be valid - newer cars offer higher mpg, so the Feds should approach it in the same analytical manner as far as TCO.

Fri, Mar 1, 2013

Too bad Rep. Duncan doesn't understand the concept of Total Cost of Ownership for IT works a little differently than car ownership. At EPA, our 2008 Dell laptops running XP are out of warranty and starting to fail in larger numbers every day. Given the MS drop-dead date for XP SP3 support, keeping this stuff going and secure is an expensive and risky proposition, no matter what Rep. Duncan says.

Fri, Mar 1, 2013

1. The computer/car comparison is not valid. 2. Government critics ask why feds are not using up to date technology so that we can be more efficient and pass the savings on to the taxpayer.

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