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Dawn Meyerriecks takes tech job at CIA

Dawn Meyerriecks

Dawn Meyerriecks is leaving her post at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence for a tech-related position with the Central Intelligence Agency's Directorate of Science and Technology team.

Wired first reported Meyerriecks' move on April 30, with the current Assistant Director of National Intelligence for Acquisition, Technology & Facilities expected to begin her new position as CIA's deputy director for science and technology shortly.

Meyerriecks has held a variety of tech-related positions over the past decade, including from 2004 to 2006 as AOL's Senior VP for product technology, where she was responsible for developing a slew of consumer-facing products, including the relaunch of AOL Instant Messenger, aol.com and Messenger's open-client platform.

She also spent a decade at Defense Information Systems Agency as chief technology officer of its Joint Interoperability and Engineering Organization and worked at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory as a senior engineer prior to her time at DISA. Meyerriecks was a judge for FCW's most recent Federal 100 awards. She is a past Fed 100 winner herself, and was GCN's Defense Executive of the Year in 2004.

“The CIA is pleased to have Dawn’s experience and expertise on the senior leadership team," said CIA spokesman Preston Golson. "Director [John] Brennan is proud that officers of the CIA’s DS&T are proven innovators, and is confident Dawn will add to this tradition of excellence.”

In a statement, Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said "filling Dawn's shoes will be no easy task."

"Dawn has done truly incredible work at ODNI and leaves a legacy of aligning and integrating the acquisition, S&T research and facilities communities across the entire IC," Clapper said. "She focused the workforces of these very different disciplines on their common mission of integrating technology into operations. I know she will be a terrific addition to the CIA Directorate of Science and Technology team." Clapper added that ODNI has a strong team and personnel ready to continue ongoing projects.

Meyerriecks will be replaced by Kevin Meiners, who previously served the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence.

"The continued ascent of acquisition and technology in the IC is due in no small part to Dawn's vision and leadership, and she leaves a strong ODNI team in place to continue her work," Clapper said.

Posted by Frank Konkel on May 01, 2013 at 12:10 PM

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