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New leader named at Navy Cyber Command

Jan E. Tighe, U.S. Navy Fleet Cyber Command

Rear Adm. Jan Tighe currently serves as the Navy Cyber Command's deputy commander.

With Vice Adm. Mike Rogers named to head up the National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command, the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/10th Fleet received word Feb. 14 of who, if confirmed, will take his place at the helm.

Navy Rear Adm. Jan Tighe, currently serving as the Navy Cyber Command's deputy commander, was nominated by President Barack Obama to step up into the commander role. She faces Senate confirmation before formally assuming leadership.

Tighe would be the first woman to command both Fleet Cyber Command and the 10th Fleet, the latter being the numbered fleet for the Navy's cyber component.

Fleet Cyber Command was established in January 2010 as the service's subcomponent to U.S. Cyber Command. The 10th Fleet originally was launched in May 1943 for anti-submarine warfare in the Battle of the Atlantic in World War II, targeting German U-boats. After being deactivated at the end of the war, it was reactivated in 2010 with the launch of Fleet Cyber Command.

Tighe has served as deputy commander since November 2013. Prior to that, she was the director of decision superiority on the Chief of Naval Operations staff in July 2011, after serving as the deputy director of Operations for U.S. Cyber Command. From November 2012 until October 2013, she additionally served as interim president of the Naval Postgraduate School, according to her Navy bio.

Posted by Amber Corrin on Feb 14, 2014 at 11:09 AM


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