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Takai to leave DOD

Defense Department CIO Teri Takai speaking at a Feb. 20, 2014, press conference.

Defense Department CIO Teri Takai told her staff on April 28 that she will step down in May.

Defense Department CIO Teri Takai is leaving the Pentagon, a spokesperson confirmed April 28. Her last day will be May 2.

The department has no immediate plans to name a successor, the spokesperson said.

Takai became DOD's CIO in October 2010 after a drawn-out process that ended with President Barack Obama withdrawing her nomination and the Pentagon restructuring the position so that it no longer required Senate confirmation.

In her email message to staff, Takai stressed the progress made on aligning DOD's "vast IT networks and resources to move toward a Joint Information Environment," as well as her office's work on cloud and mobile-first initiatives. She also announced an all-hands meeting for April 30.

Takai's departure adds to a growing list of exits by DOD executives. Former Deputy CIO Robert Carey left the Pentagon for the private sector in late March, while the Office of the Deputy Chief Management Officer -- another key driver of IT -- has seen DCMO Elizabeth McGrath, Director of Planning and Performance Management Paul Brubaker and Assistant DCMO David Wennergren leave since last summer.

Takai, who had previously served as CIO for California and Michigan, has been mentioned in recent months as a candidate for the New York City CIO position. She did not respond to inquiries regarding her plans.

Posted by Sean Lyngaas on Apr 28, 2014 at 12:55 PM


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