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Altman, Murphy, Sanghani recognized by contractor community

Anne Altman

IBM's Anne Altman was named Executive of the Year.

The Professional Services Council and the Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce on Nov. 13 announced the winners of their 2014 Greater Washington Government Contractor Awards.

Anne Altman, IBM's general manager for federal government and industries, was named Executive of the Year in the large-firm category. Millennium Engineering and Integration Co. President and CEO Patrick Murphy won in the $75 to $300 million category, and Octo Consulting Group President Mehul Sanghani won for executives at sub-$75 million firms.

While the awards recognize individual achievements, Altman and other winners stressed the community component of their success. Washington Technology Editor Nick Wakeman, who attended the event, quoted Altman as saying it is "through our work together as a community [that] we deliver value to value to our country and the world." Sanghani, Washington Technology reported, stressed the other industry leaders that he "idolized" -- and hopes to one day consider rivals.

Air Force Lt. Gen. Wendy Masiello, who runs the Defense Contract Management Agency, was recognized as the 2014 Public Sector Partner of the Year. And contractors Agilex, American Systems, Arc Aspicio, Eagle Ray and IndraSoft all received recognition for company-wide performance.

Washington Technology has more on the GovCon awards, including the other finalists in each category.

Posted by FCW Staff on Nov 14, 2014 at 10:58 AM


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