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HHS CTO steps down

Bryan Sivak

Bryan Sivak was formerly the chief innovation officer in Maryland under Gov. Martin O'Malley, a likely 2016 presidential contender.

Bryan Sivak, CTO at the Department of Health and Human Services and a 2015 Fed 100 honoree, is stepping down from his post at the end of April.

Sivak was a key player in two recent HHS innovations -- the development of a "Buyer's Club" to share institutional wisdom on procurement, and the ongoing administration of the Entrepreneurs in Residence program, which taps private sector developers to work inside HHS for a year on high-profile technology goals. Sivak also was a leader in the HHS IDEA Lab, which has empowered tech employees at the department to experiment with new ideas and collaborate with the private sector on data applications.

"Since joining us in 2012, Bryan has been a force for promoting innovation across the department, designing and deploying initiatives that improve the performance of the department for those we serve, and for our employees," HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell wrote in a March 27 email to staff. "Bryan has championed some of the department’s most innovative projects."

Sivak came to the federal government after serving as chief innovation officer in Maryland under Gov. Martin O'Malley, who is considering a 2016 presidential bid. Sivak also worked as CTO for the District of Columbia under Mayor Adrian Fenty. Before going into government, Sivak co-founded the software firm InQuira.

Posted by Adam Mazmanian on Mar 30, 2015 at 11:24 AM


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