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Rudolph exits OMB cyber post

Trevor Rudolph

Trevor Rudolph, a key architect of cybersecurity policy in the Obama administration, is departing government service for the private sector.

In his post as chief of the cyber and national security unit in the federal CIO's office at the Office of Management and Budget, Rudolph spearheaded critical efforts and helped lead policy development. He was a key player in the cybersecurity sprint, and helped develop governmentwide incident response protocols to deal with cybersecurity breaches.

He's also been involved in a White House plan to create a centralized cybersecurity model for agencies that could guide federal efforts for the next four to eight years. The plan, Rudolph told Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board members at an Oct. 27 meeting, would create a shared capabilities model that agencies might use to leverage common capabilities such as the Department of Homeland Security's Einstein and Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation services.

Rudolph is joining a cybersecurity startup called Whitehawk. The firm was founded by Terry Roberts, former deputy director of naval intelligence, and seeks to give small- and medium-sized business access to enterprise class cybersecurity protection, according to its website.

Rudolph is a two-time winner of Federal 100 honors.

News of his departure was first reported by Federal News Radio.

Posted by Mark Rockwell on Nov 07, 2016 at 2:23 PM


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