FCWInsider

Blog archive

Nesterczuk withdraws as OPM nominee

George Nesterczuk

George Nesterczuk asked to be withdrawn as the nominee to direct the Office of Personnel Management.

George Nesterczuk, who was President Donald Trump's pick to run the Office of Personnel Management, has asked the president to withdraw his nomination.

In a July 31 letter, Nesterczuk told Trump he "decided to withdraw because the prospect of my favorable confirmation has grown remote." Nominated in late May, Nesterczuk had not yet received a confirmation hearing, and he faced strong opposition from the public employee unions. 

Tim Kauffman, media relations director of the American Federation of Government Employees tweeted, "Good riddance. The federal workforce thanks you!" at the news of Nesterczuk's withdrawal.

Critics focused both on workforce-related positions Nesterczuk had taken in previous government roles and on his consulting work for the Ukrainian government. 

The withdrawal was first reported by Government Executive.

Nesterczuk was on Trump's General Services Administration landing team during the transition, and previously served in positions at OPM under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. 

OPM has been without a permanent director since July 2015, when Katherine Archuleta resigned in the wake of massive data breaches at the agency. Beth Cobert ran OPM on an acting basis for the last 18 months of the Obama administration and was nominated for the position, but the full Senate never voted on her nomination.

According to the Partnership for Public Service, the Trump administration has submitted 255 nominations for the more than 1,200 executive branch positions that require Senate confirmation. As of Aug. 2, just 60 of those nominees have been confirmed.

Posted by Troy K. Schneider on Aug 02, 2017 at 10:50 AM


Rising Stars

Meet 21 early-career leaders who are doing great things in federal IT.

Featured

  • SEC Chairman Jay Clayton

    SEC owns up to 2016 breach

    A key database of financial information was breached in 2016, possibly in support of insider trading, said the Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Image from Shutterstock.com

    DOD looks to get aggressive about cloud adoption

    Defense leaders and Congress are looking to encourage more aggressive cloud policies and prod reluctant agencies to embrace experimentation and risk-taking.

  • Shutterstock / Pictofigo

    The next big thing in IT procurement

    Steve Kelman talks to the agencies that have embraced tech demos in their acquisition efforts -- and urges others in government to give it a try.

  • broken lock

    DHS bans Kaspersky from federal systems

    The Department of Homeland Security banned the Russian cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab’s products from federal agencies in a new binding operational directive.

  • man planning layoffs

    USDA looks to cut CIOs as part of reorg

    The Department of Agriculture is looking to cut down on the number of agency CIOs in the name of efficiency and better communication across mission areas.

  • What's next for agency cyber efforts?

    Ninety days after the Trump administration's executive order, FCW sat down with agency cyber leaders to discuss what’s changing.

Reader comments

Please post your comments here. Comments are moderated, so they may not appear immediately after submitting. We will not post comments that we consider abusive or off-topic.

Please type the letters/numbers you see above

More from 1105 Public Sector Media Group