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FedTracker: Gates' deputies may not span administrations

Although President-elect Barack Obama has asked Defense Secretary Robert Gates to stay at his post in the Obama administration, the Washington Post reports that Gates' top deputies probably won't be similarly holding fast.


In particular, Deputy Defense Secretary Gordon England is expected to leave, the Post reports, citing unnamed sources. The DOD's four undersecretaries are also likely to be gone after Jan. 20, 2009, according to the article.


Some of the leaders of military branches, notably Air Force Secretary Michael Donley, may stay on, however. Meanwhile, the paper reports that the Obama transition team will announce new DOD appointments to replace the departing officials. The announcement is expected before Christmas.


Updated 4:37 p.m.


England has confirmed his plans to step down after Obama takes office. In a statement released today, England said:


"I congratulate President-Elect Obama for retaining Bob Gates as secretary, and I salute Bob Gates for his continued commitment. However, it's time for me to leave. When I came into government in early 2001, I anticipated serving for two to four years. After almost eight years, it's now time for me to turn over the reins to a successor. Also, it's most appropriate for the new administration to name its own deputy."


England said he would stay in office beyond Inauguration Day if requested, in order to ensure a smooth transition.


 


 

Posted by Michael Hardy on Dec 02, 2008 at 12:12 PM


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