Get a Life

By Judith Welles

Blog archive

What will happen in a real emergency?

Judging from comments on this blog and in other media, the Office of Personnel Management's short notice and all-out closing of government offices Feb. 13 caused some major problems for federal workers. There was congestion on the Washington, D.C., Metro system, longer commute times and for some, no way to get home when some buses stopped running at the Pentagon.

The storm of ice and snow had been predicted for several days. OPM reacted too slowly and didn't allow for a staggered release time that might have prevented some of the problems for commuters.

It may be time to dust off the emergency planning guidelines for more serious disasters. If we ever face another 2001 terrorist attack scenario, what will the scene at the Metro and on the highways look like?

Posted by Judith Welles on Feb 15, 2007 at 12:13 PM


Featured

  • Contracting
    8 prototypes of the border walls as tweeted by CBP San Diego

    DHS contractors face protests – on the streets

    Tech companies are facing protests internally from workers and externally from activists about doing for government amid controversial policies like "zero tolerance" for illegal immigration.

  • Workforce
    By Mark Van Scyoc Royalty-free stock photo ID: 285175268

    At OPM, Weichert pushes direct hire, pay agent changes

    Margaret Weichert, now acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, is clearing agencies to make direct hires in IT, cyber and other tech fields and is changing pay for specialized occupations.

  • Cloud
    Shutterstock ID ID: 222190471 By wk1003mike

    IBM protests JEDI cloud deal

    As the deadline to submit bids on the Pentagon's $10 billion, 10-year warfighter cloud deal draws near, IBM announced a legal protest.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.