Get a Life

By Judith Welles

Blog archive

Unhook yourself

Reuters reported last week that 75 percent of people surveyed by Yahoo HotJobs responded that they use their wireless devices equally for work and personal reasons. Nearly 30 percent said they are so attached to the devices that they turn them off only to sleep.

As a spokeswoman at Yahoo HotJobs observed, this certainly has changed the physical parameters of the workplace and length of the workday.

One of the most common sights today is a person connected to a cell phone. At theaters you hear the instruction to "unwrap the candy and shut off your cell phone."

Now there are smart phones that are cell phones that function like computers with teeny tiny keyboards. Of course, laptops are also small and easily carried from office to home.

If you are feeling tired these days, you might think about how much time you spend on the cell phone or the laptop. You could be a candidate for cyber burnout.

Someone suggested that instead of using wireless devices only to arrange meetings and business appointments, use them also to schedule some free time. That's one way to get some work/life balance.

Posted by Judith Welles on Apr 11, 2007 at 12:13 PM


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