Get a Life

By Judith Welles

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Commitment and productivity

A study by researchers at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital has identified factors most likely to affect employee commitment and productivity.

The researchers found that employees who derive a sense of purpose from their work and feel they can have an effect are more committed to an organization.

Certainly, those who work for government have a sense of purpose. And they can affect vast numbers of people by the work done by themselves and their agencies. If anyone lacks commitment, maybe a reminder of the broader purpose of the program is needed.

The study also found that persons with more say in decisions that affect their work have a higher level of creativity. They also have been employed for a shorter time.

Productivity is largely affected by relationships in the office, including cooperative group moods and interaction.

A previous Harvard study found that managers succeed by encouraging rewarding opportunities, such as simply having monthly team lunches. The study also found that flowers in the office have an energizing effect on people at work.

"The results lead us to conclude that workplaces that provide positive environments that foster interpersonal trust and quality personal relationships create the most committed and productive employees," said Nancy Etcoff, the lead researcher on the study.

Posted by Judith Welles on Aug 28, 2007 at 12:13 PM


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