Get a Life

By Judith Welles

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Get a Life!: Transition time and counting

The advance guard of a new appointee is an administration transition team. The members will pore over the briefing books and talk selectively with various agency executives.

Of course, sometimes a new administration appointee will sit in the wings, not really visible. However, the unseen presence lets everyone know that change will soon come.  

One time I was called to a hotel to meet a prospective appointee. He asked about my background, but did not discuss any agency issues. It turned out that he just wanted to meet those people who would ultimately be some of his direct reports. After he was confirmed, he hired some appointees to fill designated positions but made no changes among the career staff.     

So, do you stand up and get yourself known to the new team, or do you hang back and wait to be asked? Consider this: 


  1. You may be able to help newbies find their way around.

  2. Presenting ideas before a new agenda is known can backfire.

  3. Standing out makes a good target.

  4. Colleagues might despise you.

  5. No risk, no gain.

  6. You won’t be seen as a desk-hugger.


There’s still time to plan how you will deal with the transition.

Judy Welles

Posted by Judith Welles on Aug 11, 2008 at 12:13 PM


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