Get a Life

By Judith Welles

Blog archive

Get a Life: Recruiters can tweet, too!

The Merit Systems Protection Board is recommending that federal agencies polish their Internet skills and even tweet through Twitter to attract and recruit the upcoming generation of workers. 

In the current Issues of Merit newsletter, MSPB’s policy office suggested improving communication with potential recruits though use of blogging, instant messaging, Twitter tweets or short text blips, and e-mail lists. 

The MSPB also recommended establishing an agency presence on Facebook, MySpace and LinkedIn. Noting that social networks offer a diverse pool of candidates, the article calls for more reaching out through the networks.

The article also recommends upgrading agency Web sites with video so that prospective employees can get a more effective view of the important work done. After all, a generation that grows up on YouTube may get a clearer sense of critical agency missions by seeing what employees do as they actually do it. 

The idea is to help federal agencies market themselves to future recruits through networks and also provide potential employees with the motivation and information to go after federal jobs. 

So does MSPB have a place on Facebook yet? If not, it won’t be long. 


Posted on Apr 16, 2009 at 12:12 PM


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