Gov Careers

By Phil Piemonte

Blog archive

And a FEW more

We’ve got to hand it Federal Employed Women. The group, a membership organization that works for the advancement of women in government, is doing an enviable job of pushing back against the tide of anti-fed sentiment.

Last week at this time, we noted that—because of their large numbers—feds themselves have the power to influence how this national debate plays out. In that blog post, we suggested you take a look at FEW’s database of population statistics on federal workers and retirees.

This week we would suggest taking a look at yet another effort from the group, this time a new FEW document called “Federal Workers Keep America Running: Every Hour of the Day.” The publication offers 24 hours of details—in half-hour increments—outlining the critical services federal employees provide to Americans.

It’s a great piece of positive PR, and it addresses one of the key challenges facing those who advocate on behalf of feds: That the critical services feds provide are so integrated into Americans’ daily lives that those services become invisible.

This sort of advocacy provides the kinds of facts and information that can help dispel negative perceptions of federal employees—without adopting the confrontational tone of many of those who criticize the federal workforce.

Take a look. And remember it the next time you want to yell back.

Posted by Phil Piemonte on Jan 28, 2011 at 12:13 PM


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Reader comments

Mon, Jan 31, 2011

On the point of order...

I don't think there is anything wrong with the term "worker.' People who work are workers. Unless the various workers out there want to start calling themselves steel employees, auto employees, social employees, and so on.

Besides, if the term "worker" smacks of anything, so does "employee." Employ-ees are people who are employed, or used, by the employ-er. AKA "the man."

I think I'd rather be a worker than an employee.

Mon, Jan 31, 2011 NorthEast

John Said: "I went and looked at the population statistics and think some one from FEW needs to look at the numbers again.
Example Texas I found Dallas counted multiple times (1 time for each congressional district it is divided into) Ditto El Paso, Houston, San Antonio. The numbers used seem to inflate the total number! That being one example. Question how many times was New York City counted?"

The count I saw was very close to the total, based on counting the counties only once. There is a statement saying there is overlap. All information has to be read and taken in as it is reported. The numbers continually change as people retire, get hired, or leave the region/federal gov't, but all in all they are close for the most part.

Mon, Jan 31, 2011 OKC

Point of Order -

I am not a WORKER - I am an EMPLOYEE. Worker smacks a bit too much of big brother socialism.

Mon, Jan 31, 2011 John Orlando,Fl

I went and looked at the population statistics and think some one from FEW needs to look at the numbers again.
Example Texas I found Dallas counted multiple times (1 time for each congressional district it is divided into) Ditto El Paso, Houston, San Antonio. The numbers used seem to inflate the total number!
That being one example. Question how many times was New York City counted?

Mon, Jan 31, 2011

Great PR! I would love to see the Washington Post and the New York Times pick this up. Probably too much to hope that USA Today would publish this since they seem to be the ones that started this anti-Federal Employee bashing.

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