Gov Careers

By Phil Piemonte

Blog archive

OK, now let's hear it from the man himself

In a post here last week, we pointed you to a website created by President Barack Obama’s Government Reform for Competitiveness and Innovation Initiative.

On that website, you can offer your ideas on ways to: (a) increase trade, exports and overall competitiveness or (b) make other parts of the government more effective and efficient. You can also cast votes in support of ideas you approve of.

Although the site took off pretty quickly — it already had about 1,200 ideas by the time of that March 22 post — in the intervening week, the total number of suggestions has only risen to a paltry 3,200 or so.

We are a bit surprised because, judging from the comments posted on this blog, ideas are one thing that federal employee are not short on.

This week, the president apparently noticed that Gov Career Network was not ginning up enough response and so came up with his own video to invite you each to participate.

So listen to the president’s message. Then visit the site, if only to vote for one of the most popular ideas offered by feds so far: a four-day work week.

Posted by Phil Piemonte on Mar 30, 2011 at 12:13 PM


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