Gov Careers

By Phil Piemonte

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Get it over with, already

So what was that thing that went on in the House last Friday? An April Fool’s prank? Or the desperate act of a bunch of weary legislators looking to pass a fiscal 2011 budget before fiscal 2011 is over?

We’re talking about the “Government Shutdown Prevention Act of 2011,” which House Republicans passed 221-202 on April 1.

The Shutdown Prevention Act would “deem” an earlier House-passed budget as law if the Senate does not approve a budget measure by April 6. That means the House bill would become law without Senate action. Or the president’s approval. Or Constitutional authority, for that matter.

Of course the bill never had a chance of becoming law. House Republicans have characterized the bill as an attempt to tell the Senate to get its act together on the fiscal 2011 budget. Democrats rolled their eyes and called it “silly” or “symbolism.”

And for once, they both appear to be right.

You never know—this bit of political theater could be good news for you. Maybe it’s an indication that members of Congress are beginning to feel the same weariness and frustration with the process that feds have been feeling for months.

Let’s see if it helps.

Posted by Phil Piemonte on Apr 05, 2011 at 12:13 PM


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