Gov Careers

By Phil Piemonte

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Try this one on for size

Just so feds don’t think Congress is ignoring them now that shutdown fever is fading away, here’s another idea bouncing around in the House ...

Boosting probation for new hires to a period of “not less than two years.”

You’ll find that proposal in H.R. 1470, introduced last week by Rep. Dennis Ross, R-Fla., chairman of the House Subcommittee on Federal Workforce. The bill is due to be marked up by Committee on Government Oversight and Reform on April 13.

But that ain’t all.

Ross’ bill also specifies that “for purposes of any probationary period ... an employee who is transferred, promoted, demoted, reassigned, or otherwise appointed to a new position, whether before or after completing a probationary period (as so described) in a previous position and whether or not in the same agency, shall be required to satisfy the probationary period (as so described) which applies to the new position.”

Whew. In other words, all feds — new hires and existing — would have to start another two-year probationary period when transferred, promoted, etc.

And to sew matters up a little tighter, the bill also specifies that “an employee shall not … receive credit for any probationary period completed, or for any service performed toward completing a probationary period, in any other position.”

What do you think about that?

Editor's Update: Language in H.R. 1470 that would have extended the probationary period every time employees were transferred, reassigned, promoted or demoted was dropped from the bill in committee on April 13.

Posted by Phil Piemonte on Apr 12, 2011 at 12:13 PM


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