Gov Careers

By Phil Piemonte

Blog archive

Just how much is the pay freeze costing you?

One union says it can help you find out.

The International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers, which represents feds at a dozen or so federal departments and agencies, has posted a free online calculator that the union says will help you see how much you are losing under the federal civilian pay freeze.

The calculator, which IFPTE says assumes a 2 percent inflation rate on base salary, lets you enter a salary, say $50,000, and then automatically generates figures showing your annual salary over 20 years, three ways—with no pay freeze, a two-year freeze and a three-year freeze. For each year, the calculator also computes your cumulative loss under each of the two freeze scenarios.

According to the IFPTE calculator, over the course of 20 years, a two-year freeze for the $50,000 salary example cited above would cost that hypothetical employee nearly the current value of his or her salary—$47,138. Under a three-year freeze, that person would lose $68,550 over 20 years.

We don't know how this calculator works, but a union of engineers probably has decent math credentials, right?

Click here to take a look for yourself.

Posted by Phil Piemonte on Jan 04, 2012 at 12:13 PM


Featured

  • Cybersecurity

    DHS floats 'collective defense' model for cybersecurity

    Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen wants her department to have a more direct role in defending the private sector and critical infrastructure entities from cyberthreats.

  • Defense
    Defense Secretary James Mattis testifies at an April 12 hearing of the House Armed Services Committee.

    Mattis: Cloud deal not tailored for Amazon

    On Capitol Hill, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis sought to quell "rumors" that the Pentagon's planned single-award cloud acquisition was designed with Amazon Web Services in mind.

  • Census
    shutterstock image

    2020 Census to include citizenship question

    The Department of Commerce is breaking with recent practice and restoring a question about respondent citizenship last used in 1950, despite being urged not to by former Census directors and outside experts.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.