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In journalism school, you are

In journalism school, you are always told that the big question a reporter faces is not what to include in a story, but the real issue is what a reporter decide not to include in a story. You simply cannot include everything, of course -- people have limited time -- so what is important and what is not, that is the question.

This story from the Good Morning Silicon Valley blog, which credits TechDirt:

Send that algorithm back to J-school

"Articles returned by Google News tend to be significantly more biased in one direction or the other than articles from Yahoo News." This according to a study published in the Online Journalism Review that concludes Google's use of non-traditional news sources is the source of that bias. "Because it uses no human editors, Google News has considered itself immune to bias," Eric Ulken, the study's author, wrote. " 'The algorithms do not understand which sources are right-leaning or left-leaning,' Google News inventor Krishna Bharat [said] last year. 'They're apolitical, which is good.' But choosing which sites to index is perhaps as subjective an editorial decision as selecting the stories to play on the front page of a newspaper or website."

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on May 20, 2005 at 12:14 PM


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