FCW Insider

Blog archive

IRS gets the fax

Our big feature in the upcoming issue looks at IRS modernization, which over its long long history really has been the poster child for troubled government systems. But it appears that IRS has found a path that may work. Yes, I can hear you already -- "been there, done that." And yes, IRS has said many times that the agency has found the fix only to be disappointed again. At least they are making progress.

That being said, I saw this IRS press release announcing that the IRS is now accepting "facsimile" signatures on employment tax returns. I don't know about you, but when I first saw the headline, my first thought was, "A fax? How 1990s!" But read on... (my emphasis added below)...

The Internal Revenue Service has issued new rules allowing corporate officers or duly authorized agents to sign employment tax forms by facsimile, including alternative signature methods such as computer software programs or mechanical devices.

The rules, outlined in Revenue Procedure 2005-39, will reduce burden on business taxpayers by simplifying employment tax filing and lowering the number of returns rejected by the IRS because of signature issues.


TaDa!... and more than just a small step for e-government.

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on Jul 13, 2005 at 12:14 PM


Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.