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WSJ.com readers to TSA: Fix problems, then try tech

The WSJ's business travel columnist -- the column is creatively called "The Middle Seat," wrote a column recently about the Transportation Security Administration... and apparently received many comments from readers about what TSA can do to improve. Here is what caught my eye: They suggest that they fix things before using tech to help.

Here is the original column:
Experts Call For a Revamping Of Airport Security [WSJ, 10.25.2005]
Designs Sought to Boost Efficacy and Lessen Hassles; Watching TV in Line
If you have problems calling up the story, try this link.

Here is what he wrote about reader comments:
Back to Basics [WSJ.com, 10.28.2005]
Readers Think TSA Needs to Improve Customer-Service Before It Gets Fancy
There are lots of "big picture" concerns about airport security, many of which were considered in this week's "Middle Seat" column. And there are lots of day-to-day concerns that readers still confront every time they get on a flight, such as items stolen from bags checked by the Transportation Security Administration.

Before TSA gets around to high-tech solutions and major strategy shifts in keeping airplanes safe from terrorists, the agency needs to better police its own officers, and improve its customer service when items do go missing, readers said. Some reported expensive shirts with tags still on them were stolen. One told of a gun stolen from the luggage of a Navy SEAL. All said they got little help from TSA when filing claims.

Again, if you have problems getting the story, try this link.

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on Oct 28, 2005 at 12:15 PM


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