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Congress' tech leaders

CNet today posts its "Technology Voters Guide" rating how tech savvy various lawmakers are.

Ever since the mid-1990s, politicians have grown fond of peppering their speeches with buzzwords like broadband, innovation and technology.

John Kerry, Al Gore and George W. Bush have made fundraising pilgrimages to Silicon Valley to ritually pledge their support for a digital economy.

But do politicos' voting records match their rhetoric? To rate who's best and who's worst on technology topics before the Nov. 7 election, CNET News.com has compiled a voter's guide, grading how representatives in the U.S. Congress have voted over the last decade.


The best and worst:

Highest-scoring
Senate Democrat:
Maria Cantwell (WA)
Highest-scoring
Senate Republican:
George Allen (VA): 78%

Lowest-scoring
Senate Democrat:
Daniel Akaka
Lowest-scoring
Senate Republicans:
Mike DeWine (OH)
Richard Shelby (AL)

Highest-scoring
House Democrats:
Zoe Lofgren (CA)
Ellen Tauscher (CA)

Highest-scoring
House Republican:
Ron Paul (TX)

Lowest-scoring
House Democrats:
John Barrow (GA)
John Salazar (CO)
Pete Visclosky (IN)

Lowest-scoring
House Republicans:
Geoff Davis (KY)
Lynn Westmoreland (GA)

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on Nov 02, 2006 at 12:15 PM


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