FCW Insider

Blog archive

LAT: Too many tech groups?

One of the difficult things when I'm away is that I get to read the entire paper -- sometimes multiple papers -- and then I see things and forget where I saw them. I managed to chase this one down, however. A piece in the LAT from earlier this week:

Tech's mixed message [LAT, 12.31.2006]
The diverse trade groups representing computer and Web firms may need to consolidate to be more effective in D.C.


The top of the story is pretty good:

The old sports adage says there's no "I" in "team." But for the information technology industry, there's no "team" in "IT."

Unlike most major industries, high tech has no all-encompassing trade association to push its agenda at the White House and on Capitol Hill. Instead, about two dozen groups represent all or parts of the industry, with enough acronyms for a heaping bowl of alphabet soup: AeA, BSA, CCIA, CEA, EIA, SIA, SIIA, ITAA, ITIC and USIIA, to list some.

"When it comes to lobbying, everyone else is Snow White and we're the Seven Dwarfs," said Phillip J. Bond, president of the Information Technology Assn. of America (not to be confused with the Information Technology Industry Council).


How have I not even heard of a few of these groups?

And from our world, they missed ACT/IAC.

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on Jan 03, 2007 at 12:16 PM


Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.