FCW Insider

Blog archive

The Doomsday Clock

A quote of the day from the WSJ.com's very readable Morning Brief e-mail newsletter. They used this as their quote of the day ... and it is a stark reminder about some of the big issues we face these days.

"Since Hiroshima and Nagasaki, no nuclear weapons have been used in war, though the world has come uncomfortably close to disaster on more than one occasion. But for good luck, we would all be dead. As we stand at the brink of a second nuclear age and a period of unprecedented climate change, scientists have a special responsibility once again to inform the public and advise leaders about the perils that humanity faces. We foresee great peril if governments and society do not take action now to render nuclear weapons obsolete and prevent further climate change. As scientists, we understand the dangers of nuclear weapons and their devastating effects, and we are learning how human activities and technologies are affecting climate systems in ways that may forever change life on Earth," legendary cosmologist and mathematician Stephen Hawking said, as the group of scientists who runs the Doomsday Clock -- a countdown to Armageddon begun in 1947 -- was moved two minutes closer to midnight at 11:55 to reflect climate change and the nuclear programs of North Korea and Iran, as the Times of London reports.

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on Jan 18, 2007 at 12:16 PM


Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.