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RFID in the spotlight

In this week's issue of Federal Computer Week, on FlipSide, we looked U.S. Passport holders that block RFID signals. Apparently people are concerned about privacy.



And then there is this story from the SJMN out of California:

Raising privacy alarm over RFID chips [SJMN, 6.19.2007]
ASSEMBLY TO WEIGH STRONGER PRIVACY REGULATIONS FOR TINY RADIO DEVICES

SACRAMENTO -- Attempting to prevent a potential clash between privacy rights and the latest technological advances, a Palo Alto lawmaker is trying to dissuade the state government, schools and private businesses from tracking people through the use of radio frequency identification devices such as electronic cards and implanted devices.

A legislative package of four measures by Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto), will be introduced in an Assembly committee today that would prohibit an employer from implanting tiny ID chips in workers, block RFID technology from being embedded in driver's licenses, prohibit schools from issuing ID cards to track student attendance and make it a misdemeanor to skim identification cards -- a method in which identity thieves secretly read the cards of unsuspecting people and clone new versions.


They say that ideas often start in California, so...

Posted by Christopher Dorobek on Jun 19, 2007 at 12:16 PM


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