FCW Insider

Blog archive

FCW Insider: More talk about Obama's CTO

A deputy chief technology officer, drawn from the ranks of career executives, makes perfect sense, says one reader.


Bob Greeves, a long-time member of the federal IT community, proposed the idea last week, saying that person "would provide stability during transitions and changes of political CTO's (that normally change at the rate of one every 18 months or so)." (Read more about it here.)


"As usual, Bob Greeves is right on target," the reader responded. "A career deputy CTO will make the newly appointed political CTO more effective by having someone at hand, loyal to him/her, who knows the career power structure (no oxymoron intended) and how to get things done."


Meanwhile, here's another perspective on the CTO, from Andrew McAfee, a blogger and associate professor at Harvard Business School (who graced FCW's cover a year ago -- read the Q&A)


"This is one of those brilliant ideas that seems glaringly obvious in retrospect -- of course the most technically advanced, innovative, and computer intensive economy on the planet should have a high-ranking official in the federal government dedicated to technology issues! Why haven’t we had one since the dawn of the mainframe, PC, or Internet Eras? Still, much better late than never."


Read McAfee's complete blog post.


What do you think? Post a comment here or send your thoughts as a letter to the editor and we will post them for you.

Posted by John Stein Monroe on Nov 18, 2008 at 12:18 PM


Featured

  • FCW PERSPECTIVES
    sensor network (agsandrew/Shutterstock.com)

    Are agencies really ready for EIS?

    The telecom contract has the potential to reinvent IT infrastructure, but finding the bandwidth to take full advantage could prove difficult.

  • People
    Dave Powner, GAO

    Dave Powner audits the state of federal IT

    The GAO director of information technology issues is leaving government after 16 years. On his way out the door, Dave Powner details how far govtech has come in the past two decades and flags the most critical issues he sees facing federal IT leaders.

  • FCW Illustration.  Original Images: Shutterstock, Airbnb

    Should federal contracting be more like Airbnb?

    Steve Kelman believes a lighter touch and a bit more trust could transform today's compliance culture.

Stay Connected

FCW Update

Sign up for our newsletter.

I agree to this site's Privacy Policy.