John Klossner

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Public service or just a paycheck -- why do you work for the government?

My wife spent the first part of her career as a newspaper reporter, working for publications throughout New England. About 15 years ago, she was approached by a former colleague who invited her to join him in the press relations office of a federal agency. She has been working there ever since. I can safely say my wife enjoys being a government employee, although I don't think she ever felt an overwhelming desire to use her skills in government work before taking this position. The job came up, and she took it.

I share this because lately -- with all the turmoil surrounding government employees and their roles and functions -- I have been interested in what motivates people to first become government workers, and what still motivates them.

So I would like to ask any public-sector employee a few questions.

How did you get your job?

Were you specifically looking for a government job?

Does it make a difference to you whether you work in the public or private sector, or is it just a job?

Basically, why are you a government employee?

If any government employees would like to answer via the comments section, my only requests are that you a) be bluntly honest; b) keep it brief; and c) not treat it as a campaign speech.

I may compile these at some future point, but the comments section may do that for me.

John Klossner

Posted on Jun 15, 2011 at 12:19 PM


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