John Klossner

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Should we cap pay for cartoonists?

A couple recent cartoons concerned issues in the Department of Defense.

The first was based on a story that addressed government contracts covering a certain share of contractor executives' salaries. As stated in the article, "Currently, the Executive Compensation Benchmark is based on the median amount provided to senior executives in large U.S. corporations. The cap stands now at $763,000. Instead, the committee's defense bill would align the maximum amount of compensation with federal employees, which is set at the annual salary of the vice president. It's $230,700."

No word on how many corporate executives were heard to remark " If I wanted to get paid like the vice president, I would have become the vice president."

cartoon contractor executive compensation

And two more -- here and here -- tell of the DOD passing a regulation limiting reports to Congress to no longer than 10 pages, which caused members of Congress to accuse them of possibly withholding information and limiting transparency, which caused the DOD to rescind the order while promising to make reports more thorough and concise.

It remains to be seen whether reports will now be triple-spaced.

DOD Reports cartoon

Posted by John Klossner on Aug 17, 2012 at 12:19 PM


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