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Union coalition urges feds to take action against pay cuts

If you’re steaming about the proposed cuts to federal jobs and pay, it’s time to call your congressional representatives and give them a piece of your mind, says the Federal Workers Alliance, a coalition of 22 unions.

The coalition is urging federal employees across the nation to call their members of Congress to tell them to prevent cuts to government jobs and compensation as part of a payroll tax cut extension.

Government employees are “sick and tired of being used as a political bargaining chip,” said FWA Chairman William R. Dougan. Not only did federal employees accept a two-year pay freeze, they have also put up with being called “overpaid, underworked bureaucrats more times than I can count,” he said.

“At some point, you have to stand up and say enough is enough,” Dougan added. “That day will be today for thousands of dedicated federal employees.”

FWA has also released a flyer that urges federal employees to take action. “Here we go again,” it reads. “Washington politicians are trying to play politics with federal workers over extending the payroll tax cut. As you read this, they are considering a pay freeze extension, cuts to your retirement plan, and the elimination of hundreds of thousands of federal jobs.”

"Tell Congress you’re not a political bargaining chip!” the flyer continues and lists the number to the Capitol switchboard (in case you don’t have your rep on speed dial): 202-224-3121.

Posted by Camille Tuutti on Dec 12, 2011 at 12:19 PM


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