FAA seeks digital tool to aid investigations

Shutterstock image: software development.


What: The Federal Aviation Administration is looking for a new software tool to complement its digital forensic evidence abilities.

Why: Because of the remote nature of most FAA forensic work, the agency needs software that can create a remotely accessible depository where digital media analysts can work on the go.

Analysts need to be able to store digital forensic evidence, distribute workload among investigators in multiple locations, allow remote analysis of evidence by analysts, track workflows and deadlines, and give investigators read-only access to reports and data.

The FAA issued a pre-solicitation seeking a commercial off-the-shelf forensic case management software tool that can be used in the collection, handling, protecting and preserving of digital forensic evidence. The goal is to have all forensic tools centralized for access by analysts.

Analytical tools such as Forensic Tool Kit, PRKT Forensics, X-Ways Forensics and ENCASE must be able to integrate with the management tool. It also must be able to accommodate at least 15 users at one time, with at least five users being able to work on the same case at the same time.

Click here to see the posting, which closes Oct. 31. 

Posted by Colby Hochmuth on Oct 21, 2014 at 9:04 AM


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