Cyber Command turns to industry for solutions

Wikimedia Image: U.S. Cyber Command logo.


WHAT: The Defense Information Systems Agency has issued a draft RFP for a contractor to help "streamline" U.S. Cyber Command’s "acquisition of cyber-related services" and to provide the command with a range of cyber-related products and services.

WHY: This would be the first indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract vehicle for supporting Cyber Command, a four-year-old military command charged with defending Defense Department information networks (DODIN) and projecting U.S. power in cyberspace. Though still in draft form, the contract is intended to help a centralized Cyber Command keep up with diffuse threats by furnishing the military with IT solutions for command and control, intelligence, and to support all parts of DODIN and the Joint Information Environment.

Given the prominence of Cyber Command in U.S. cybersecurity policy, winning part or all of the contract would be a boost to any firm's prestige and reputation, not to mention its coffers.

The list of potential business is long. "The contractor shall assist the government by furnishing technically qualified personnel, products, materials, facilities, travel, services, managed services and other items needed to satisfy the research, development, deployment, operation, maintenance and sustainment requirements of USCYBERCOM," the draft states.

Prospective contractors with questions on the draft RFP should submit them by noon EST on Jan.  12.

The work for this U.S. Cyber Command “omnibus contract” consists of four task orders that can be found on the draft RFP's main page.

Posted by Sean Lyngaas on Jan 07, 2015 at 8:40 AM


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