DHS wants to EASE into new cyber defenses

Shutterstock image: cyber defense.

What: The Department of Homeland Security looks to create an instantly self-repairing network environment to respond to cyberattacks as they happen.

Why: The initial RFI in a planned series from DHS's National Protection and Programs Directorate Office of Cybersecurity and Communications looks to collect information from industry and other sources about the concept of an enterprise automated security environment.

EASE is way of thinking about overarching cybersecurity -- not a concept and not a specific entity, system, or program, says the RFI. The EASE concept envisions an environment in which automated and dynamic enterprise-level cyberspace defense capabilities -- such as adaptive sensing, sense-making, decision-making, and acting -- provide shared situational awareness and support response in “cyber-relevant time.” For DHS, that means was addressing the split second-driven environment that network communications operate in. EASE isn't a capability, said DHS, but a way to enable government to improve cyber-defense capabilities with enhanced interoperability and automation.

Read the RFI here.

Posted by Mark Rockwell on Feb 06, 2015 at 8:00 AM


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