TSA is running out of space

Shutterstock image (by Andrey VP): glowing data center with a falling matrix.

What: Transportation Security Administration statement of objective to expand its data storage system.

Why: TSA is running out of space on its current enterprise storage array devices on its storage area network (SAN). Those devices, according to the statement of objective, currently provide 236 terabytes of total raw storage capacity, which amounts, to 153TB of usable capacity.

TSA said in a notice on FedBizOps that it intends to issue a formal solicitation for the expansion within the next 30 days.

The agency didn't specify exactly what kind of data was stored on the devices, but said the "SAN environments recognizes and supports acquisition cycles, product lifecycles, and mission needs." The statement of objective said all services, hardware and software provided under this task order must be compliant with DHS's rules on handling personally identifiable information and privacy incident response.

TSA wants an overall solution to expand its storage infrastructure, through a small business set aside, single sourced, indefinite delivery indefinite quantity contract vehicle that will allow the agency to purchase storage blocks for up to eight years. It's also looking to include options for operations and maintenance and storage management.

The base requirements include delivery, installation and migration of a minimum 480TB of usable storage capacity, distributed across two physical devices, with the capability of supporting 600,000 inputs/outputs per second (or 300,000 IOPS per physical device) for a mixed workload environment, within 60 days of a contract award.

Posted by Mark Rockwell on Apr 13, 2015 at 8:41 AM


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